Dry Needling

Dry Needling

Bodies in Balance PT offers dry needling as an adjunctive treatment to the total physical therapy treatment plan. As defined by the APTA (American Physical Therapy Association), dry needling is ” a technique physical therapists use to treat myofascial pain. The technique uses a “dry” needle, one without medication or injection, inserted through the skin into areas of the muscle, known as trigger points.

Other terms commonly used to describe dry needling, include trigger point dry needling, and intramuscular manual therapy.

Dry needling is not acupuncture, a practice based on traditional Chinese medicine and performed by acupuncturists. Dry needling is a part of modern Western medicine principles and supported by research

Bodies in Balance offers dry needling at $30/ per 10-20 min session by physical therapists who have completed certification in dry needling. View the below videos to learn more about dry needling and see a case study on how it improved a patient’s pain and mobility:

What is dry needling?

Chelsea’s story with dry needling:

Who may benefit from dry needling?

Some examples of diagnoses that may benefit from dry needling are:

  • Cervicogenic headaches
  • Active trigger points
  • Muscular strain
  • Tendonitis/osis
  • TMJ dysfunction
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Pain related to postural dysfunction.
  • Post operative care

What to expect while being dry needled?

The patient does not usually feel the needle insertion. However, once the needle reaches the trigger point, one may feel tightness or a muscle twitch.

What to expect after you’ve had dry needling

  • Soreness is expected 24-48 hours post treatment
  • Localized bruising is one of the most common side effects
  • More range of motion in the surrounding joints
  • Fatigue post treatment

What to do after having dry needling?

  • Continue your home exercises unless otherwise instructed
  • Can ice on the area for 10-15 min
  • Move/stretch the surrounding areas

What to tell your physical therapist during the next visit?

  • How did you feel after dry needling?
  • How long did your soreness last?
  • How long did you have the decrease in pain or improved range of motion?